Emil's World

The world through a rat's eyes

explore-blog:

Photo 51 – the seminal X-ray diffraction image of DNA taken by Raymond Gosling in May 1952, under the direction of Rosalind Franklin, whose work was critical in decoding the structure of DNA.

explore-blog:

Photo 51 – the seminal X-ray diffraction image of DNA taken by Raymond Gosling in May 1952, under the direction of Rosalind Franklin, whose work was critical in decoding the structure of DNA.

(Source: , via explore-blog)

“I don’t want to know everything,I just need to know where I find it when I need it .”

—   Albert Einstein (via atomstargazer)
schickjessica:

The world in a drop of sea water.

schickjessica:

The world in a drop of sea water.

(via molecularlifesciences)

A Hippo and Tortoise Tale : NPR


Cassini spies Mimas hiding in Saturn’s rings
Credit: NASA / JPL / SSI / Gordan Ugarkovic

Cassini spies Mimas hiding in Saturn’s rings

Credit: NASA / JPL / SSI / Gordan Ugarkovic

(Source: kenobi-wan-obi, via scinerds)

droppingthephysics:

Because liquids and gases in the stomach do not separate adequately away from the presence of gravitation, astronauts are incapable of burping in space. This makes carbonated sodas difficult to drink in micro-gravity.

(via atomstargazer)

illusionwanderer:

awkwardsituationist:

“world of averages” - composite images culled from thousands of individual portraits resulting in symmetrical average faces

christinetheastrophysicist:

Physicists from CERN team up with TED-Ed to create five lessons that make particle physics child’s play

As part of TEDxCERN, physicists from the famous institution, home of  the Large Hadron Collider (and birthplace of the Word Wide Web), teamed up with animators from TED-Ed to create easy-to-understand animated lessons that explain concepts like dark matter, big data and the Higgs boson in lay terms.
Read More.

christinetheastrophysicist:

Physicists from CERN team up with TED-Ed to create five lessons that make particle physics child’s play

As part of TEDxCERN, physicists from the famous institution, home of  the Large Hadron Collider (and birthplace of the Word Wide Web), teamed up with animators from TED-Ed to create easy-to-understand animated lessons that explain concepts like dark matter, big data and the Higgs boson in lay terms.

Read More.

ikenbot:


laughingsquid:

Philographics, Illustration Series Depicts Philosophical Theories as Simple Graphics

white supremacy *
atomstargazer:




An Astronomer’s Fantasy - Planets in the Lab

If astronomers could somehow pull planets out of the sky and analyze them in the laboratory, it might look something like this artistically altered image illustrating new research from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope. The infrared observatory allows astronomers to study closely the atmospheres of hot Jupiter planets — those outside our solar system that orbit near the blistering heat of their stars.  In this image, an artistic version of a hot Jupiter inspired by computer simulations has been inserted into a photo showing a Spitzer researcher, Heather Knutson, in a laboratory at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, where she works. In reality, Knutson does not work in a lab, nor wear a lab coat and goggles, but scrutinizes telescope data from her office computer.  Knutson is the co-author of a new study led by Nikole Lewis from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge. They used Spitzer to monitor a hot Jupiter, called HAT-P-2b, as it orbited all the way around its star in an eccentric, comet-like orbit. This allowed the team to watch the planet heat up as it moved closer to the star, and cool down as it moved away — almost like putting a Bunsen burner to a planet in a laboratory.  Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

atomstargazer: